FBI Investigates Shooting of Air Force Helicopter in Virginia

Landing Huey

An UH-1N Iroquois lands at Joint Base Andrews, Md., April 13, 2017. The helicopters belong to the 1st Helicopter Squadron, which performed a medical evacuation of a downed pilot during the F-16 Fighting Falcon crash incident April 5. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Jordyn Fetter)

An UH-1N Iroquois lands at Joint Base Andrews, Md., April 13, 2017. The helicopters belong to the 1st Helicopter Squadron. Photo courtesy of DVIDS/Senior Airman Jordyn Fetter.

The FBI is investigating the shooting of an Air Force helicopter in northern Virginia that injured a crew member Monday.

The UH-1N Huey from the 1st Helicopter Squadron at Joint Base Andrews in Washington was flying a training mission over Middleburg, Virginia, when it was shot from the ground nearby, according to the New York Times.

“Initial findings are that the helicopter was struck by a bullet resulting in a minor injury to an aircrew member and damage to the aircraft,” a Joint Base Andrews spokesperson told Coffee or Die over email.

The helicopter was forced to make an emergency landing at Virginia’s Manassas Regional Airport. The injured crew member was taken to a local hospital, treated, and released, according to officials.

The FBI and US Air Force Office of Special Investigations are investigating the incident together. The FBI is asking the public to call in any information connected with the incident.

The 1st Helicopter Squadron supports distinguished visitor flights, medical evacuations, and search and rescue assistance in the area. Its primary mission is to transport key government officials during national emergencies.

Joshua is a staff writer for Coffee or Die Magazine. He has covered the 75th anniversary of D-Day in France, multinational military exercises in Germany, and civil unrest during the 2020 riots in Minneapolis that followed the death of George Floyd. Born and raised in small-town South Dakota, Joshua grew up playing football and soccer before serving as a forward observer in the US Army. After leaving the service, he earned his CrossFit Level 1 certificate and worked as a personal trainer while earning his paramedic license. Joshua went on to work in paramedicine for more than five years, much of that time in the North Minneapolis area, before transitioning to a career in multimedia journalism. Joshua is married, has two children, and is currently pursuing his bachelor’s degree in multimedia journalism. His creative outlets include Skovlund Photography and Concentrated Emotion, which is where he publishes poetry focused on his life experiences.
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