FBI: Russian Oligarch’s $300 Million Luxury Yacht Seized in Fiji

Webp.net-resizeimage

On Thursday, May 5, 2022, Fijian law enforcement executed a seizure warrant freezing the motor yacht Amadea, a 348-foot luxury vessel owned by sanctioned Russian oligarch Suleiman Kerimov. US Department of Justice photo.

Police officers on the island nation of Fiji have seized the Amadea, a $300 million luxury yacht owned by Russian oligarch Suleiman Abusaidovich Kerimov.

The Thursday raid in the port of Lautoka stemmed from a federal court order signed last month that placed the Cayman Islands-flagged 348-foot vessel into forfeiture following allegations that Kerimov violated the International Emergency Economic Powers Act and laundered money.

“This ruling should make clear that there is no hiding place for the assets of individuals who violate US laws. And there is no hiding place for the assets of criminals who enable the Russian regime,” said Attorney General Merrick B. Garland in a prepared statement. “The Justice Department will be relentless in our efforts to hold accountable those who facilitate the death and destruction we are witnessing in Ukraine.”

A member of the Russian Federation Council with close ties to Kremlin strongman Vladimir Putin, Kerimov was detained in France on Nov. 20, 2017, and held for two days on suspicion of bringing hundreds of millions of euros there, often stuffed into suitcases, without reporting the currency to tax authorities.

Five months later, the US Treasury’s Office of Foreign Assets Control slapped Kerimov, 56, with economic sanctions, alleging that he launders funds by purchasing villas. The oligarch holds large stakes in Russian natural gas, gold, and banking companies.

Luxury Yacht

On Thursday, May 5, 2022, Fijian law enforcement executed a seizure warrant freezing the motor yacht Amadea, a 348-foot luxury vessel owned by sanctioned Russian oligarch Suleiman Kerimov. US Department of Justice photo.

On May 5, 2022, Fijian law enforcement executed a seizure warrant freezing the Motor Yacht Amadea, a 348-foot luxury vessel owned by sanctioned Russian oligarch Suleiman Kerimov. US Department of Justice photo.

According to a highly redacted FBI affidavit buttressing the seizure of the yacht, Kerimov allegedly has tried to hide his Aug. 16, 2021, purchase of the vessel by using shell companies and Cayman Island law firms to transfer the yacht’s title.

On Feb. 24 — the day Russia invaded Ukraine — agents say the Amadea’s crew turned off its automated information system, which acts like a beacon in case of a maritime calamity. It remained off intermittently as the yacht sailed from the Caribbean, through the Panama Canal, to Mexico, and then to Fiji.

They also estimate that Kerimov must spend up to $30 million annually to maintain and license the luxury vessel, transactions that are conducted in dollars the oligarch is forbidden by the US Treasury to use, often flowing through US financial institutions his wealth is banned from entering.

agents

US agents joined Spain’s Guardia Civil authorities to board and seize luxury yacht Tango on April 4, 2022, while it was moored on the Mediterranean island of Mallorca. Screenshot via US Department of Justice video.

US agents joined Spain’s Guardia Civil authorities to board and seize luxury yacht Tango on April 4, 2022, while it was moored on the Mediterranean island of Mallorca. Screenshot via US Department of Justice video.

Although paperwork filed by the Amadea’s crew indicates their next destination is the Philippines, FBI agents suspect they were trying to abscond to the Russian port of Vladivostok, beyond the reach of international law enforcement.

“This seizure demonstrates the FBI’s persistence in pursuing sanctioned Russian oligarchs attempting to evade accountability for their role in jeopardizing our national security,” said FBI Director Christopher Wray in a prepared statement. “The FBI, along with our international partners, will continue to seek out those individuals who contribute to the advancement of Russia’s malign activities and ensure they are brought to justice, regardless of where, or how, they attempt to hide.”

Read Next: Authorities Seize $90 Million Yacht of Russian Oligarch Close to Strongman Vladimir Putin

Carl came to Coffee or Die Magazine after stints at Navy Times, The San Diego Union-Tribune, and Pittsburgh Tribune-Review. He served in the Marine Corps and the Pennsylvania Army National Guard. His awards include the Joseph Galloway Award for Distinguished Reporting on the military, a first prize from Investigative Reporters & Editors, and the Combat Infantryman Badge.
More from Coffee or Die Magazine
Airmen assigned to the MacDill Air Force Base are allowed to evacuate as Hurricane Ian approaches, but some may have to pay for their own evacuation.
The combined Chinese-Russian surface action group intercepted by US forces earlier in September in the Bering Sea was far more powerful than initially reported.
Ukraine’s defense intelligence agency reported that Russian commanders authorized rear detachments to open fire on soldiers who abandon their battlefield positions.
A Houston, Texas, couple was stunned to find that a gun case they bought from an online surplus retailer held a dozen M16-style rifles.
The defense team is trying to punch holes in the prosecution’s theory about what caused the Bonhomme Richard blaze.
The Chinese-Russian surface action group was sailing north of Kiska Island.
Larry Nemec mysteriously disappeared off his boat near Galveston, Texas.
NCIS claims Seaman Recruit Ryan Mays sparked the $1.2 billion Bonhomme Richard blaze.
TacGas, a media production company for the tactical and entertainment industries, made its mark producing and capturing hyperrealistic and supremely accurate military simulations for its clients’ marketing and training needs.
Now that active-duty Army recruits can select their first duty stations, Alaska’s bases and Fort Carson, Colorado, have come out on top. Midwestern bases and Bragg — not so much.